The fever doesn’t show until 14 days later.

The fever doesn’t show until 14 days later.

posted on 31 Jan 2020 in Chinglish, Menus

Photo courtesy of Sk8r.
Found in Beijing, China.

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Algernon
Algernon
7 months ago

Oh Corona

Algernon
Algernon
7 months ago

They’re out of Old Wuhan

Droll not Troll
Droll not Troll
7 months ago

The first time this was cooked must have been a test tickle.

Droll not Troll
Droll not Troll
7 months ago

Finger food – very gently.

Droll not Troll
Droll not Troll
7 months ago

Warning! After eating this dish, you may turn pink.

Droll not Troll
Droll not Troll
7 months ago

@engrishwebmaster: By then, sufferers are two week to get out of bed.

Marum
Marum
7 months ago

Could be worse.

It could be; Fried Tackle.

Eggrish
Eggrish
7 months ago

One little tickle for your stomach, then the real tickle when you go for a trickle.

Droll not Troll
Droll not Troll
7 months ago

@Marum: From the look of it, this could be rolled strips of foreskin. The foreskin of what, is anybody’s guess!

Droll not Troll
Droll not Troll
7 months ago

Where are our learned linguists? I was hoping someone would post a translation of the Chinese version.

Peter Chan
Peter Chan
7 months ago

@Droll not Troll | 10:14 pm |

Believe me . . . the funny Chinese term (咯吱) does not mean anything to me (even as a native Chinese user from Hongkong) at all apart from sounding like ‘ku-chi.’

I am absolutely clueless as to what this ‘deep-fried ku-chi’ actually is.

Marum
Marum
7 months ago

The Kuchi or Afghan.The Pakistan Pashtun call them “Ghiljak” or “Kucchi”Shepherd is an Afghan livestock guardian dog, taking its name from the Kuchi people of Pakistan and Afghanistan. It is a working dog following the nomads, protecting caravans and flocks of sheep, goats, camels and other livestock from wolves, big cats and thieves.

Stollen from Wonkypedia.

I am much happier now, it is merely fried dogs tackle.

Droll not Troll
Droll not Troll
7 months ago

@Peter Chan: Ku-chi is a possible clue. Someone might say “Coochy-coo” when tickling a baby. Although, how this translation could come from there… 😕

alexmagnus
alexmagnus
7 months ago

Pleco dictionary translates 咯吱 as “creak, groan”.

Chinese Wikipedia has no article on this dish, but Baidu Baike has one: https://baike.baidu.com/item/%E7%82%B8%E5%92%AF%E5%90%B1

Google refused to translate the name of the dish, saying simply “Fried”.

Droll not Troll
Droll not Troll
7 months ago

Ref. Peter Chan’s translation: Anyone heard of Ku Ichi soba? I’ve seen references to it, but can’t find any info. Maybe that’s what this is.

Droll not Troll
Droll not Troll
7 months ago

BTW, I know that soba is a buckwheat noodle, just have never heard of Ku Ichi before.

Peter Chan
Peter Chan
7 months ago

@Droll not Troll | 4:38 am |

‘Ku ichi’ is unmistakably Japanese that could mean ‘九一’ (literally 91), and ‘soba’ is the Japanese term for ‘buckwheat noodles.’

‘Ku Ichi’ is more likely merged into ‘kuichi’. meaning 91.

So ‘Ku ichi soba’ could well mean ’91 Soba Restaurant’ . . . 91 being the name of the soba restaurant. Japanese people often name their shops/restaurants with numbers.

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