Straight from the Euphrates river

Straight from the Euphrates river

posted on 3 Apr 2020 in Engrish from Other Countries, Menus

Photo courtesy Jamie Matthews.
Found at restaurant in Phuket, Thailand. 

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Droll not Troll
Droll not Troll
6 months ago

Oh, no! Dinner is ruined!

Droll not Troll
Droll not Troll
6 months ago

City Wok – now we know which city.

Algernon
Algernon
6 months ago

Don’t mention the war

Algernon
Algernon
6 months ago

So not from the Mekong

Frank Burns
Frank Burns
6 months ago

I don’t understand this……..

Marum
Marum
6 months ago

The Thais do tend to babylon.

Marum
Marum
6 months ago

You can’t babylon with oyster sauce.

‘Cos any noise annoys an oyster.

Marum
Marum
6 months ago

Before euphrates, you need Marine Insurance.

James
James
6 months ago

Did Ali G spot the Babylons again?

Eggrish
Eggrish
6 months ago

This engrish is sourced from phuket, which probably also describes the mindset of this menu’s translator.

A very Babylonian mindset I might add!

Marum
Marum
6 months ago

@Eggrish 0121 . A Babylonian concept could be one of having no zero. So in cuneiform writing, zero was only noted by the absence of a number, even though they understood the concept of nothing/ness.

So. If a place marker was used as a zero, it was only used medially, not laterally. (at either end of a number)

Try making your computer work that way. Besides, a printer which would turn ou cuneiform stone tablets, would indeed be a sight to behold.

Marum
Marum
6 months ago

PS. Being the mad engineer, i have an idea for one.

it would exude synthetic liquid rock through an electromagnetic jet like a 3D Printer which makes metal objects.

FOR IF YOU HAD ONE WHICH GROUND THE ROCK TO THE DESIRED MESSAGES. YOU WOULD HAVE TO DO MORE THAN SHOUT, TO MAKE YOURSELF HEARD OVER IT

markm
markm
6 months ago

Cuneiform used clay tablets, not stone. They punched wedge-shaped marks into the wet clay, using sticks with a triangular cross section. It seems to have been primarily used for taxes and other government records. It was much easier than stone-cutting, and the tablets lasted indefinitely if dried and stored in a dry place. I think there are more of these preserved from 3 – 5,000 years ago than stone with surviving writings, but that’s probably because the Babylonians made _many_ more of them. OTOH, you do have to get the whole page done before the clay dries. In the Niven… Read more »

Peter Chan
Peter Chan
5 months ago

What is the taste of lons, let alone babylons?

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